Crossroads

At the intersection of technology, finance and the Pacific Rim.

Sunday, August 20, 2006

Leadership

So what do you do after you have been President of the US for eight years. How do you "retire" and get on with your life at the age of 53. The NY Times describes his activities at his annual conference of government, business, entertainment and NGO leaders:

What sets it apart from other such high-minded conferences is Mr. Clinton's insistence that participants not just discuss these daunting problems but also do something concrete about them — or not be invited back. A staff of four works full-time on "commitments management."
Since the program began with a conference in September, almost 300 corporations, individuals and nonprofit groups have committed more than $2.5 billion to an array of good works, his staff says. Some projects would have happened anyway, but Mr. Clinton estimates that more than half are genuinely new.

"More and more people were saying to me all the time: 'What can I do? What can I do? Tell me something to do,' " Mr. Clinton said in an interview. "I just heard it all the time. So here we are in New York. The United Nations meets here. We can bring together all kinds of people from all over the world. So I just decided to organize a 'What can I do?' conference. And then try to do it every year for a decade."

At the risk of being trite, this is seeing a problem as an opportunity.

3 Comments:

Blogger ky choi said...

"~ seeing a problem as an opportunity." I've become to like this expression. It is a really facinating turn-around view from an usual practice which has focused on to remove or avoid a problem. I'll try to adopt this view onto my business and life!. By the way, I'd love to see this sort of action from our former presidents in Korea soon. ㅠ.ㅠ

9:52 PM  
Blogger Stan Sakai said...

Dear KY,

In my opinion, seeing problems as opportunities is one of the key attributes for doing something good for yourself and your important others. The other day, I was listening to the head of the Stanford Entrepreneurial Program say that all great entrepreneurs have the ability to see problems as opportunities, take inventory of their assets to see if they can make a difference and then, if so, marshall their assets in a way that addresses the problem. Whether it is Bill Clinton or KY Choi it is all the same process.

10:19 PM  
Blogger ky choi said...

Dear Stan,

Thanks for your comment, and always appreciate your efforts to communicate with all of us who are intereted in your view on the various issues.

3:38 PM  

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